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Hakushu Single Malt Whisky, 18 Year Old

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(Image Source: JPWhisky.net)

 

Following Yamazaki in the first issue, I would like to introduce Hakushu 18 Year Old, another single malt whisky from Suntory.

Keizo Saji, the second generation master blender, decided that he wanted to make a whisky with a different taste from Yamazaki, which was made at the oldest distillery in Japan, so he built a new distillery at the foot of Mt. In pursuit of the delicious water that is essential for whiskey production, he searched all over Japan for a suitable place for a distillery and arrived at Hakushu. We hope you will enjoy Hakushu 18 Year Old, which is poured after 18 years of maturation in an environment blessed with nature.

 

Tasting Notes

It has the deep taste and aroma that only a long matured malt can provide while maintaining its refreshing taste.

The complex richness, sweetness, and rich barrel aroma are in perfect harmony. It also has a pleasant aftertaste with a hint of smokiness. Long-aged malt, more than 18 years old, produces a deep aroma and a hint of smokiness.

The complex richness and sweetness of the malt and the aromatic scent of the oak are in perfect harmony.

Enjoy the smoky and pleasant aftertaste.

 

(Image Source: JPWhisky.net)

 

Official Bottling Information

Alcohol content 43% alcohol by volume
By alcohol Single malt whisky
Barrel type Heavy peat, white oak, sherry casks over 18 years old, etc.
Contents 700ml
Number of bottles sold
Suggested retail price 27,500 yen (tax included)
Release date 2006

 

Aromas Melon, mango, milk caramel, and a hint of smokiness
Taste Honey-like sweetness, sweet and sour
Aftertaste Ripe fruit aroma, smoky and pleasant aftertaste

 

Our Take

Although not as expensive as Yamazaki 18 year, Hakushu 18 years is also becoming a very expensive product. Naturally, there is no doubt that the “taste” is superb. I think it’s safe to say that the taste is worth the price, which includes the scarcity value.

It was more than 18 years ago, in the year 2000, that the original spirit that produced Hakushu 18 Year was produced. At that time, whisky consumption in Japan was on a downward spiral, and no one predicted that whisky would explode in popularity in the future. I think it will remain high for at least another 10 years.

 

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